Saturday, December 16, 2017

French Winawer 4.a3 to 4.e5

David Parsons was the ultimate club player. He knew his pet lines by experience rather than by memorized exact knowledge. Second rate familiar moves score better than accurate unfamiliar moves. Club players perform better in comfortable positions.

Parsons played a French Defence Winawer. White played 4.a3, but we transposed to 4.e5 after 6.e5. My games with Dave almost always reached a phase where pieces were flying all over the place. This was no exception. He swapped queens to draw my king out with 10.Kxd2. Then we build up for a major tactical assault. When the dust cleared after move 27, we entered a decisive knight endgame.

Sawyer (2011) - Parsons (1682), Williamsport, PA 1994 begins 1.e4 e6 2.d4 d5 3.Nc3 Bb4 4.a3 Bxc3+ 5.bxc3 c5 6.e5 Nc6 7.Be3 [7.Qg4+/=] 7...cxd4 8.cxd4 Qa5+ 9.Qd2 Qxd2+ 10.Kxd2 f6 11.Nf3 Bd7 12.Bd3 Rc8 13.Rab1 Rc7 [13...b6=] 14.Rhc1 [14.exf6 Nxf6 15.Bf4+/-] 14...Nge7  [14...f5=] 15.exf6 gxf6 16.c4 [16.Bf4+-] 16...e5 [16...dxc4 17.Bxc4=] 17.cxd5 Nxd5 18.dxe5 fxe5 19.Bxa7 Nxa7 [19...Be6 20.Ng5+/-] 20.Rxc7 Nxc7 21.Rxb7 Nab5 [21...e4 22.Bxe4+-] 22.Rb8+ Ke7 23.Rxh8 Nxa3 24.Rxh7+ Kd6 25.Nxe5 Bb5 26.Rxc7 Kxc7 27.Bxb5 Nxb5 [Simplified to this endgame.]
28.Ke3 Kd6 29.Nd3 Ke6 30.g4 Nd6 31.f4 1-0

Sets: Chess Games 1.e4 Series and Chess Games 1.d4 Series
Copyright 2011-2017 Author Page / sawyerte@yahoo.com
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Friday, December 15, 2017

Queens Knight Anti-Sicilian

My long-term advantage vs a 3000 rated computer didn't help with my short time on the clock. Sicilian Defence provides proven pawn structures and piece placements. If White wants to avoid main lines, the Queens Knight Attack with 1.Nc3 makes it possible. The problem for White is making progress in development.

Any chess program rated over 3000 is impressive. I'd have to disconnect its internet connection for me to win. Sometimes I draw. When CraftyWiz played on the Internet Chess Club it used Crafty v20.1 from Las Vegas, Nevada. Its operator was “TheWiz”.

Sawyer (2385) - CraftyWiz (3096), ICC 5 0 Internet Chess Club, 15.06.2004 begins 1.Nc3 c5 2.Nf3 Nc6 3.d4 cxd4 4.Nxd4 g6 5.Be3 [5.Nxc6!? bxc6 6.e4 Bg7 7.Bc4 Qc7 8.0-0=] 5...Bg7 [5...Nf6 6.g3 d5 7.Nb3 e5 8.Bg5 d4 9.Bg2 Be7 10.Bxf6 Bxf6 11.Nd5=] 6.Nxc6 bxc6 7.Bd4 Nf6 8.Ne4 Rb8 9.Nxf6+ Bxf6 10.Bxf6 exf6 11.b3 0-0 12.e3 Qa5+ 13.Qd2 Qe5 14.Qd4 [14.Rd1 d5 15.Be2+/=] 14...Qxd4 15.exd4 Re8+
[Black short term rook activity but White as long term queenside pawn activity.] 16.Kd2 d6 17.Bd3 Be6 18.Rhe1 Rb7 19.Rad1 Rbe7 20.c3 Kg7 21.c4 h5 22.g3 a5 23.f4 Kh6 24.Re3 d5 25.c5 Bg4 26.Rxe7 Rxe7 27.Re1 Rxe1 28.Kxe1 h4 29.Kd2 g5 30.Be2 hxg3 31.hxg3 Bd7 32.Ke3 Kg6 33.Bd3+ [33.a3!? gives winning chances, but not with only a minute on my clock. It's unlikely that I'd win, and very likely that I'd lose on time.] 33...Kh5 34.Be2+ Kg6 35.Bd3+ Kh5 36.Be2+ Kg6 [Draw by repetition] 1/2-1/2

Sets: Chess Games 1.e4 Series and Chess Games 1.d4 Series
Copyright 2011-2017 Author Page / sawyerte@yahoo.com
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Thursday, December 14, 2017

King Fianchetto in 10 moves

Ray Haines sent me this fast win with his comment that it was a "quick lesson on how not to use the queen." True. Let me add that the game also shows what happens when White develops only one minor piece in 10 moves. That's almost always fatal against good play. Ray Haines found the tactical shot that instantly wins White's queen.

RodrigoPeligro (1493) - rrhaines33 (1478), Live Chess, 10.12.2017 begins 1.g3 d5 2.Bg2 f5 [2...e5!] 3.c4 [3.Nf3] 3...e6 4.Qa4+ [4.Nf3+/=] 4...Bd7 5.Qb3 Nc6 [5...Bc6=] 6.cxd5 Nd4 [6...exd5] 7.Qc4 [7.Qd3] 7...e5 8.a4 [8.Na3!?] 8...b5 9.axb5? [9.Qd3 bxa4=] 9...Bxb5 10.Qc3? [10.Qa2 Nc2+ 11.Kf1 Nxa1 12.Qxa1 e4 13.Nc3 Bd7=]
10...Bb4! 0-1 [If 11.Qb4 or 11.Qe3 is forked by 11...Nc2+ winning the queen.]

Sets: Chess Games 1.e4 Series and Chess Games 1.d4 Series
Copyright 2011-2017 Author Page / sawyerte@yahoo.com
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Wednesday, December 13, 2017

Blackmar-Diemer Gambit 1.Nc3

Tim Spanton got an advantage in a Blackmar-Diemer Gambit against Wim Van Hoek. The game began as a Queens Knight Attack with 1.Nc3, but it soon transposed into a Staunton Gambit of the Dutch Defence. Black's extra doubled pawn on e4 is hard to hold. The Black king is stuck in the center for the moment. White had a good position at first, but things spun out of control after an unfortunate blunder on move 14.

Spanton (1858) - Van Hoek (1907), 43rd Guernsey Open 2017 Vale GCI, 18.10.2017 begins 1.Nc3 d5 2.d4 f5 3.e4 dxe4 4.f3 Nf6 5.fxe4 fxe4 6.Bg5 Bf5 7.Bc4 [7.Nge2!?=] 7...a6 8.Nge2 Nc6 9.0-0 Bg6 [9...e6!?]
10.a3 [10.Be6!+/=] 10...Qd7 11.b4 b5 [11...0-0-0=] 12.Bb3 Rd8 13.d5 Qg4 14.Nf4? [White drops a piece. Better was 14.Qc1+/-] 14...Qxg5 15.Ne6 Qe3+ 16.Kh1 Qxc3 17.Nxc7+ [17.dxc6 Rd6 18.Nxc7+ Kd8 19.Ne6+ Kc8-+] 17...Kd7 18.Ne6 Kc8 19.Rxf6 [Even if White picks up the Exchange with 19.Nxd8 Nxd8-+ Black still has three extra pieces for a rook.] 19...gxf6 20.Qg1 e3 21.dxc6 Rd2 22.Nc5 e5 23.Nxa6 Qxc6 24.Qxe3 Qxg2# 0-1

Sets: Chess Games 1.e4 Series and Chess Games 1.d4 Series
Copyright 2011-2017 Author Page / sawyerte@yahoo.com
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Tuesday, December 12, 2017

Philidor Defence Like Pirc Win

Ray Haines won against a Philidor Defence using my favorite Pirc Defence line. My approach involves Be3, f3, 0-0-0, and a kingside attack. Here White's move 6.Bg5 allowed a tactical possibility if Black chose 6...c6. The moment passed but Ray Haines obtained a good position. He won by attacking the center and kingside simultaneously.

[Check out Philidor 2.Nf3 Playbook for White, or Four Knights Playbook for White, or Petroff 2...Nf6 Playbook for Black.]

rrhaines33 (1609) - MoralArcOfTheUnivers (1482), Live Chess 25.11.2017 begins 1.e4 e5 2.Nf3 d6 3.d4 exd4 4.Nxd4 Nf6 5.Nc3 g6 [5...Be7] 6.Bg5 c6 [White wins material.]
7.f3 [The Nf6 is in some danger. 7.e5! dxe5 8.Nxc6 Qxd1+ 9.Rxd1 Nxc6 10.Bxf6+- wins] 7...Bg7 8.Qd2 0-0 9.g4?! [9.0-0-0+/-] 9...b6 [9...d5!=] 10.h4 Qc7 11.0-0-0 Nbd7 12.Bh6 [12.h5+-] 12...Ne5 13.h5 c5 14.Bxg7 Kxg7 15.hxg6 fxg6 16.Qh6+ [16.Ndb5!+-] 16...Kf7? [16...Kg8 17.Ndb5 Qg7 18.Qxg7+ Kxg7 19.Be2+/=] 17.Ndb5 Qc6 18.Rxd6 1-0

Sets: Chess Games 1.e4 Series and Chess Games 1.d4 Series
Copyright 2011-2017 Author Page / sawyerte@yahoo.com
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Monday, December 11, 2017

Alekhine Two Pawns Attack

Alekhine Defence Two Pawns Attack or Chase Variation leads to less familiar positions. Play allows for a certain amount of originality. Better tactical players usually win. That is why I train every day. My Tactics ratings on chess.com and on lichess.com have both topped 2200. And I still do Chessimo tactics training which I've done for 10 years using a program originally developed by Grandmaster Gilberto Milos of Brazil.

Tactical skills can offset slightly inferior openings. The higher rated Robert Zelcic left the book in this Alekhine Defence against Zdenko Padjen. The players had to develop their own plans. Robert Zelcic gradually turned the game in Black's favor.

[Alekhine 1…Nf6 Playbook gives you a basic repertoire.]

Padjen (2006) - Zelcic (2493), 2nd Krunoslav Hulak Mem Zagreb CRO, 30.11.2017 begins 1.e4 Nf6 2.e5 Nd5 3.c4 Nb6 4.c5 Nd5 5.Bc4 e6 6.Nc3 Nf4!? [6...Nxc3=]
7.Qf3 [7.g3+/=] 7...Ng6 8.d4 Nc6 9.Be3 d6 10.exd6 cxd6 11.0-0-0 d5 12.Bd3 Be7 13.Qg3 [13.h4!?] 13...Bd7 [13...b6=/+] 14.Nf3 Qb8 15.Kb1 0-0 16.Bxg6 fxg6 17.Rhe1 b6 18.Qxb8 Raxb8 19.cxb6 axb6 20.Bc1 b5 21.b3 h6 22.Re2 g5 23.h3 Bd6 24.Ne5 Nxe5 25.dxe5 Bc5 26.f3 b4 27.Nxd5 [27.Na4 Ba7=/+] 27...exd5 28.Rxd5 [28.e6 Bb5-+] 28...Bf5+ 29.Kb2 Rbc8 30.e6 Be7 0-1

Sets: Chess Games 1.e4 Series and Chess Games 1.d4 Series
Copyright 2011-2017 Author Page / sawyerte@yahoo.com
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