Monday, December 14, 2015

4 Gruenfeld Defence books for Christmas

Today we consider the Gruenfeld Defence in recent books. We know the Gruenfeld as a sharp opening after 1.d4 Nf6 2.c4 g6 3.Nc3 d5. Both sides play in the hope to win. You must be prepared. You need tools that help you understand how to play the Gruenfeld Defence. Books such as the ones below provide you with good ideas to improve your play. These books give you good ideas.

My 12 days of Christmas is over, but I have more books to highlight. With this post, I return to my normal schedule of Monday, Wednesday, Friday.

1. The Grunfeld Defence, Vol. 1 (Grandmaster Repertoire 8) by Boris Avrukh
Grandmaster Avrukh covers all the Gruenfeld except the Exchange Variation 4.cxd5.

2. The Grunfeld Defence, Vol. 2 (Grandmaster Repertoire 9) by Boris Avrukh
The author covers the popular Exchange Variation 1.d4 Nf6 2.c4 g6 3.Nc3 d5 4.cxd5.

3. Chess Developments: The Grünfeld by David Vigorito
This provides a helpful service to update Gruenfeld players on new ideas in practice.

4. The Ultimate anti-Grunfeld: A Saemisch Repertoire by Dmitry Svetushkin
This details the possibilities after 3.f3 vs the Gruenfeld or the King's Indian Saemisch.

My Chess Training Repertoire will cover the Gruenfeld in early 2016. A new opening sheet is sent out every to my email list each Thursday. Sign up and start getting it.

You may also like: King Pawn (1.e4 e5) and Queen Pawn (1.d4 d5)
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Thursday, December 10, 2015

4 Open Games 1.e4 e5 books for Christmas

The tenth day we consider the Open Games in chess books. Double King Pawn openings with 1.e4 e5 tend to resemble hand to hand combat. Many players happily play both sides in these openings with the hope to win. Since these are popular openings, you must be prepared. You need good tools that help you understand how to play the Open Games. Books such as the ones below provide you with good ideas to improve your play. You need to guidance to navigate the mine fields. These books give you good ideas.

1. Opening Repertoire: The Open Games with Black by Martin Lokander
The author demonstrates how playing 1.e4 e5 as Black develops your chess.

2. Bologan's Black Weapons in the Open Games: How to Play for a Win if White Avoids the Ruy Lopez by Victor Bologan
This is the companion volume to the grandmaster's work on the Ruy Lopez.

3. The Modern Vienna Game: 1.E4 E5 2.Nc3 by Roman Ovetchkin and Sergei Soloviov
The main idea is 3.Bc4 which I played for many years with 2.Bc4 and 3.Nc3.

4. King's Gambit (Grandmaster Guide) by John Shaw
This impressive tome is the current definitive standard on the King's Gambit.

My Chess Training Repertoire in the tenth issue covers the Open Game. Sign up for my email list and start getting it.

You may also like: King Pawn (1.e4 e5) and Queen Pawn (1.d4 d5)
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Wednesday, December 9, 2015

4 Catalan and Nimzo books for Christmas

The ninth day of December we consider the Nimzo-Indian, Queens Indian, Bogo-Indian and the Catalan in chess books. In response to the planned White set-up of 1.d4 and 2.c4, Black plays 1...Nf6 and 2...e6. Black's strategy is to develop the king's bishop classically. Many grandmasters play this openings from both sides of the board. How do they hope to win? By discovering tools they understand better than their opponents. You must be prepared. Books such as the ones below provide you with good ideas to improve your play. These books give you good ideas.

1. Grandmaster Repertoire 1A: 1.d4: The Catalan by Boris Avrukh
This is a welcome update edition of Grandmaster Avrukh's popular repertoire.

2. The Queen's Indian: Move by Move by Lorin D'Costa
A full-time chess teacher explains for you one of the most popular defenses.

3. Opening Repertoire: Nimzo and Bogo Indian by Christof Sielecki
The author provides a reliable repertoire for Black after the 1.d4 Nf6 2.c4 e6.

4. Nimzo-Indian: Move by Move by John Emms
A famous openings expert gives his grandmaster advice one move at a time.

My Chess Training Repertoire in the ninth issue covers the Nimzo-Indian Defence. Sign up for my email list and start getting it.

You may also like: King Pawn (1.e4 e5) and Queen Pawn (1.d4 d5)
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Tuesday, December 8, 2015

4 Dutch & Bird books for Christmas

The eighth day of Christmas is for the Dutch Defence (1...f5) and Bird's Opening (1.f4). These f-pawn openings give you easy to play set-ups. Your ability to win will depend on your experience and your understanding of the tactics and strategy for each line. Most of your opponents will do little or no preparation to meet this variations. To take advantage of their lack of knowledge, you need good tools that show you how to play the Dutch Defence and Bird's Opening. Books such as the ones below provide you with good ideas to improve your play. These books give you some interesting ideas and examples.

1. The Diamond Dutch: Strategic Ideas & Powerful Weapons by Viktor Moskalenko
The author provides in depth examination of lines needed for a Black repertoire.

2. Birds' Opening: Move by Move by Cyrus Lakdawala
One of our favorite teachers explains thematic tactics and important strategies.

3. Dismantle the Dutch Defense with the Dangerfield Attack: A New Way to Fight the Stonewall, Classical, Leningrad and Fianchetto Variations by David I. Rudel
The author is noted for Colle Systems and other innovative opening approaches.

4. The Polar Bear System 1: Dangerous & strong! by GM Henrik Danielsen
A grandmaster demonstrates his approach to the Bird's Openings in his games.

My Chess Training Repertoire covers the Dutch Defence with the eighth issue. Sign up for my email list and start getting it.
You may also like: King Pawn (1.e4 e5) and Queen Pawn (1.d4 d5)
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Monday, December 7, 2015

4 French Defence Books for Christmas

On the seventh day of December we consider the French Defence in chess books. This defense has been amazingly popular for over 100 years. In the French after 1.e4 e6 both sides play to win. Positions become unbalanced. White has a kingside space advantage. Black has one on the queenside. Whoever can successfully bust open the center has the biggest advantage. You must be prepared. You need good tools to understand how to play the French Defence opening. Books such as the ones below provide you with good strategies and tactics to improve your play. These might give you some good ideas.

1. Grandmaster Repertoire 16: The French Defence by Emanuel Berg
The third volume in this famous series covers the Tarrasch and Advance Variations.

2. The Even More Flexible French: Strategic Ideas & Powerful Weapons by Viktor Moskalenko
The author offers several ideas in all the major variations of the French Defence.

3. The Classical French: Move by Move by Cyrus Lakdawala
This book has very detailed coverage of the 1.e4 e6 2.d4 d5 3.Nc3 Nf6 variations.

4. French Defense: The Solid Rubinstein Variation by Hannes Langrock
Coverage of the 3...dxe4 line as well as lines for Black vs other rare White moves.

My Chess Training Repertoire covers the French Defence on the seventh week. Sign up for my email list and start getting it.

You may also like: King Pawn (1.e4 e5) and Queen Pawn (1.d4 d5)
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Wednesday, November 18, 2015

London System Opportunity Tactics

The London System is an easy opening for you to play. Your main idea is to play Bf4 on move two or three. By move six or seven, White has developed all four minor pieces. The solid pawn structure of d4, e3, and c3 is tough to crack. It resembles a Slav Defence reversed.

How does White win? By targeting weaknesses. When all the pieces are actively poised, tactics for attack and combinations hide around every corner. My biggest problem comes when I think nothing is going on. I can sleep through a key moment. In the game below, I was awake to my opportunity.

In my APCT postal game against Richard Riley, the weakness of playing ...b6 and ...Nc6 before he castled allowed White to win a pawn. The loss of a pawn followed massed exchanges from moves 12 to 16. The opening mistake led to an endgame win. It is not sudden, but Black's loss can hardly be avoided.

Sawyer (2003) - Riley (1405), corr APCT Q-139 (11), 07.1993 begins 1.d4 Nf6 2.Nf3 e6 3.Bf4 b6 4.e3 Bb7 5.Nbd2 d5 6.c3 Bd6 7.Bd3 Bxf4 8.exf4 c5 9.Ne5 Nc6? [Because of the pin, White will win a pawn. Correct is 9...0-0 10.0-0=] 10.Bb5 Rc8 11.Qa4 Qc7 12.dxc5 0-0 13.Bxc6 Bxc6 14.Nxc6 Qxc6 15.Qxc6 Rxc6 16.cxb6 Rxb6 [After a series of exchanges White is up a pawn.] 17.b3 Rc8 18.c4 dxc4 19.Nxc4 Rbc6 20.0-0 Rd8 21.Rfd1 Rxd1+ 22.Rxd1 g6 23.Rd6 Rxd6 24.Nxd6 [Now we reach a knight and pawn endgame.] 24...Nd5 25.g3 Kf8 26.Kf1 Nc3 27.a4 a6 28.Ke1 Ke7 29.Kd2 Kxd6 [Black's best chance seems to be 29...Nxa4 30.Nxf7 Nc5 31.b4 Ne4+ 32.Ke3+/=] 30.Kxc3 a5 [All pawn endings are lost. For example 30...Kc5 31.b4+ Kd5 32.g4+-] 31.b4 axb4+ 32.Kxb4 Kc6 33.Kc4 Kb6 34.Kd4 f6 35.g4 1-0


You may also like: King Pawn (1.e4 e5) and Sicilian (1.e4 c5)
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Monday, October 12, 2015

Caro-Kann Mood to Fight

A fighting spirit gives you a higher rating. Your opponents do not all resign quickly just because you show up. You need to make good moves. Just let the result happen. Don't cut it short. Before my rating surged past 2000 I was timid when playing stronger players. Once I learned to not offer draws my rating went up.

George E. Fawbush had a fighting spirit and almost never agreed to draws. GEF won frequently. He lost sometimes. He always fought hard. In my Caro-Kann Defence in the 4.c4 Panov Variation vs George Fawbush I got a good position with the 5...g6 Gruenfeld type line. White chose the sharp 6.Qb3 idea but he went wrong ten moves later.

Probably I offered the draw. I imagine Fawbush agreed because he stood worse. The other issue was that this game came from a Tennessee Chess Association event where he may have determined that he was not going to win. Five years later I beat Fawbush in a game analyzed by Arthur Bisguier.

Fawbush (2200) - Sawyer, corr TCA 1977 begins 1.e4 c6 2.d4 d5 3.exd5 cxd5 4.c4 Nf6 5.Nc3 g6 6.Qb3 Bg7 7.cxd5 0-0 8.Be2 Nbd7 9.Bf3 Nb6 10.Bg5 a5 11.Bxf6 [11.Nge2 a4 12.Qb5 Bd7=] 11...exf6 12.Nge2 Bf5 13.Qb5 Re8 14.0-0 Qd6 15.g4 Bd7 16.Qd3? [16.Qc5 Nc8 17.Ne4 Qb8=] 16...f5 17.h3 fxg4 18.hxg4 f5 [18...Rac8=/+] 19.Kg2 [19.Nb5 Bxb5 20.Qxb5 fxg4 21.Bxg4 Nxd5=/+] 19...fxg4 20.Bxg4 [20.Be4 Rac8-/+] 20...Bxg4 21.Qb5 Qf6 [Black stood better when a draw was agreed.] 1/2-1/2


You may also like: King Pawn (1.e4 e5) and Queen Pawn (1.d4 d5)
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